How to place a cache of your own

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How to place a cache of your own

Postby admin » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:59 pm

General discussions about how to get started and place caches of your own (caching 101) or places that sure could use a cache, etc.
Last edited by admin on Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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One man's opinion on the very basics of cache placement.

Postby BackpacknJack » Fri Jan 26, 2007 12:04 am

First off, I commend you for wanting to be a good cache owner.
It took me some time before I thought I had studied enough and knew enough to start hiding caches because I also wanted to be a good cache owner. Trust me when I tell you that my conclusions come from thousands of miles of driving, many miles of hiking repeatedly to the same caches, some I logged and some I have not and just keep them on my watch list, keeping track of how well folks "trade up or trade even", how well they "replace it just as you found it so others will have the same challenge", etc. plus reading lots of online cache logs to find out what folks really like.
Here is what I found out:
---The harder it is to find, the better folks like it.
---The harder it is to get to, the better folks like it.
---The easer it is to find, the better folks like it.
---The closer to the car door, the better folks like it.

So to fit these rigorous requirements gleaned from all that research I placed a cache you just leave out in the open-- an ammo can that few can find without using "phone-a-friend"-- a cache where you just take what ever you want and leave nothing-- a cache that has something you can't get anywhere else-- a cache in a kid friendly place-- a cache in a historical location-- a cache just off the trail-- a cache just 31ft from the car door-- a cache back in the woods-- and one of those very unique hand made containers that have not been seen before.
Now I will admit that I chose to hide caches in the "No Man's Lands" of south eastern Ark where there isn't a "view" but if I did have one of those "views" I think I would have covered all the bases.
So now, my conclusions because of all the extensive research that has taken me thousands of miles and many hours of watching and revisiting caches plus reading logs.
Be it a 35mm film canister just dropped in the leaves or a fake acorn on a fake limb of a fake tree in the middle of a fake forest, it will be enjoyed by those who enjoy that type of cache hide and not by those who do not enjoy that type of hide. Every cache has something to offer so where ever you place it, how ever you hide it, cachers are going to enjoy it.
All that said, there is one type of cache that I have noticed is not enjoyed by anyone and that is a missing or unmaintained (wet log etc.) cache. Maintaining or not maintaining your cache is a direct reflection on you, your fellow cachers and geocaching in general... not the size or type or difficulty or number of caches you have placed. So place any type of cache you like, your time or resources will allow, or will fit in your caching area but please maintain it.
BPNJ
Last edited by BackpacknJack on Sun Feb 18, 2007 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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What is Geocaching?

Postby BackpacknJack » Sat Feb 03, 2007 1:06 pm

What is Geocaching?

Geocaching in it’s simplest form is just a high tech treasure hunt where you are given the coordinates of a hidden container (Geocache) and you use a GPS or sometimes maybe just the clues to find it.
There are different types of caches, some very large and some very small and some very sneaky ones too. On a caching trip, or hunt, you may find fake rocks or fake limbs or real limbs and real rocks with containers inside of them. A favorite tried-&-true container is the ammo can because of it’s toughness and water proof seal but the imagination of the cache owner (the one who hid it) is about the limit of what you may find.

Hiding a cache:
If you want to hide a cache there are guide lines that must be followed to keep the game safe, sane and fun before the online home site, http://www.Geocaching.com will post the coordinates of your cache’s location and a trained reviewer assigned to your state from geocaching.com (just called GC by most) will have to OK your online submission to make sure you have followed your states caching rules for managed lands, etc.

Finding a cache:
To be able to hunt caches you must set up an ID and password for the online Geocaching site listed above to be able to see the coordinates but it is a free game/sport/pastime/hobby and open to anyone. About all you will need is access to a GPSr, access to the internet, and a sense of adventure.
There are easy ones to find, hard ones to find and even some that have never been found.
There are over 305,200 caches in 220 countries (Sep 2, 2006) around the world, more then 2,300 here in Arkansas .
A few basic common sense rules apply. If you take something leave something so trade up or trade even. Replace the cache just as you found it. Watch out for non cachers (called muggles) when searching or uncovering or replacing the cache so it doesn’t come up missing. Show respect for the area around the cache location and leave no trace you were there.


Now it gets more complicated: :shock:
The easy part is over now and we get down to the cache types.
There are containers to small for a pen or pencils called “Micro caches" that have only a small log inside where you write your ID and the date.
There are large containers with toys and other things that may be fun to find called “Regular caches".
There are “Mystery caches" that can be almost anything you can sign.
There are “Letter Box caches" and “Letter Box Hybrids” where you stamp the log with your (supposedly) handmade stamp and use the cache’s stamp on your log book.
There are “Travel Bug Hotels” where you trade hitchhikers, or travel bug tags (called TBs for short) that are traveling on mission, like visit beaches and take pictures, go on boat trips, visit old CCC camps, etc.
There are even caches that are not caches at all, called “Virtual caches" where you maybe visit an historic site, etc. and email the owner of the cache some clue you will find at that location showing you had been there.

The game is constantly evolving and improving plus is growing almost faster then you can keep up with but you can learn more about it by visiting http://www.geocaching.com where you will find over 600+ links to news articles plus other info. You are also welcome to join our group here at TAAG and ask your questions or leave your comments.
Just remember if you are not an Arkansan nor interested in Arkansas geocaching, almost every State plus 220 countries have local groups where you can get or share info.
We wish you good luck in all your outdoor adventures!

TAAG (The Associated Arkansas Geocachers)
http://www.ArkGeocachers.org
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Caching at your own Level

Postby BackpacknJack » Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:29 pm

There are more techno/geeky folks who cache then about any other outdoor activity you could possibly engage in so lots of geeky techno stuff goes into their caching but there are also cachers who like their caching a lot less complicated.
Not even GPS arrows to point them, some cachers only use the numbers displayed on their GPSr to find the caches they seek so they don’t want to or need to load anything, into anything, they just copy down the coords for the cache location and watch the numbers on the GPSr.
Caching really can be just that simple.
There are disabled folks plus marathoners and every physical level in-between.
There are those who like snakes plus those who maybe don’t even like dirt.
There are those who like long hikes in the deep woods plus those who don’t even what to turn their car engine off.
There are folks who are allergic to poison ivy plus there are folks like me who obviously are only allergic to dusting. :oops:
There are single moms who cache with small children so they must worry about the safety of the cache locations where they stop plus there are big old greasy men like me who clear a path at the mall so they aren’t very concerned about where the cache is.
Aside from the pure adventure of it, that is one of the best things about caching. You can do it *if* and *when* and *where* and *how* and *how often* you want to, using *what ever* you want to use. I have read the post of cachers who had found a dozen or more caches before they actually decided to get a GPS. There are lots of city caches that can be found only using the description and there are micros and virtuals in the most public places you could ever find, like the River Market in LR or the Mc-Mall in NLR or downtown Clarksville, etc. plus many many other places. In fact, for the price of a few good meals you can get a GPS and just use the coords of cache locations to find all the really cool places in the world and never even look for the caches. (I read that some folks do that very thing).
PS. I’m not trying to push the game here, I’m just trying to push doing it the way you want to do it and enjoying it at what ever level you and your family or friends enjoy without thinking you are doing it the wrong way.
What other outdoor activity can an 80 year old disabled grandfather find to enjoy with his 8 year old grandson when they don’t even enjoy the same foods or movies and surely not the same music, and they can do it tens of thousands of times in 220+ countries around the world and with only a $89 GPSr (plus tax in a store near you :) ???
Note: (added 2-18-07) E-trex is on sale at SW-LR Wal-Mart for $79.00
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Postby Q » Mon Sep 15, 2008 6:52 pm

Figuring the coords..... yes my unit will average. Do I simply let it average whilst I hide or do I need to consider time of day or anything to get a better reading? How many sats are showing or something? I know that my unit is sometimes right on and sometimes 10 or so feet off. Just looking for some ideas here. A couple of the first ones I am gonna do will be no brainers... as in when you drive up ya oughta know where it is. But one hide I am gonna do tricky. just want the coords to be close to right.

Any one looking over here???
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Postby BackpacknJack » Tue Sep 16, 2008 1:51 pm

Q wrote:......./ I know that my unit is sometimes right on and sometimes 10 or so feet off. Just looking for some ideas here....../Any one looking over here???


My advice????? Just take your time and let the GPS settle down then mark the spot. Go at it from a few different directions if possible to see if it will zero back on that same stop (I have marked such spots on my property and check them from time to time) and pick some number in the middle. If only one approach is available....>"set it and forget it"<

My experience????? Blue skies or solid skies don't seem to effect my Garmin as much as partial cloudy skies. Partial cloudy is maybe the worst conditions (again, my experience) because the sats are zooming around and the signal is passed through tall clouds one minute (maybe) and through clear skies the next. The time of day doesn't matter but the degree of angle between sats does.

My opinion?????? You get us cachers within 10ft of a cache and we can find a needle in a haystack. Or even a fake needle in a fake haystack on a fake farm. :wink:
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NOTE:
The opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent that of management, or anyone who has ever used a GPS, or seen a GPS, or anyone who can even spell GPS but I hope this has been a big help!!!!!!!!

PS. Just do it MR. Q. You can adjust later and I bet not one person here will gripe about your coords not being perfect - - well not more then once per cacher anyway, and instead they will just be glad there are more caches to hunt and they were placed by someone who is at least trying to do it right. :D
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